Spiritual Warfare

For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.

Eph. 6:12

Spiritual warfare is the battle between God and Satan for the souls of men and women. Satan is the prince of this world (John 12:31) and desires to devour humankind (1 Peter 5:8) in order to bring hurt and pain to the heart of God. Christ has entered this world as God incarnate in human flesh to destroy the works of the Devil (1 John 3:8) and rescue us from the oppression and imprisonment of Satan (Luke 4:18). The weapons of our warfare are intercessory prayer, dedicated fasting, spiritual gifts, obedience to God, intimacy with Christ, sacraments of the church, physical healing, and demonic deliverance.

Ultimately, Christ won the warfare on the Cross, but the full realization of his victory will not be manifested to the world until his second advent. Until then, we fight like the Allies in World War Two: they knew that victory was assured in 1944, yet they needed to take back the ground that the Nazis and Japanese imperial forces had conquered in ’40 and ’41.

In the mean time, Christ has extricated Satan from his advantaged position. Satan can no longer bring charges against us, expose our debt of sin, or keep us living in shame and doubt. Because of Christ’s triumph on the cross, we stand in a position of victory for we hold the spiritual high ground. We hold that ground by faith for we are seated with Christ in the heavenlies. We simply “stand” knowing that we fight from a position of victory (Eph. 2:6, 6:11, 13-14).

What is the enemy seeking to do? To dislodge you. Now Christ puts us into the victorious position, the impregnable position, and He gives us an armour that we might be enclosed in Him, and we must take it by faith, and hold it by faith, and fight by faith from that victorious position. It is the fight of faith. We begin in victory.

Evan H. Hopkins, “Standing Fast,” Daily Thoughts from Keswick: A Year’s Daily Readings, ed. Herbert F. Stevenson (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1980), 212.